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Charles Murray (of The Bell Curve fame) drops another turd in the punch bowl with his latest work:

Mr. Murray’s newest book, Coming Apart: The State of White America, 1960-2010 (Crown Forum), makes a pretense of making nice. It bills itself as an attempt to alleviate divisiveness in American society by calling attention to a growing cultural gap between the wealthy and the working class.

Focused on white people in order to set aside considerations of race and ethnicity, it discusses trends, like the growing geographic concentration of the rich and steadily declining churchgoing rates among the poor, that social scientists of all ideological leanings have documented for decades. It espouses the virtues of apple-pie values like commitment to work and family.

But Mr. Murray, a Harvard and MIT-educated political scientist, seems wired like a South Boston bar brawler in his inability to resist the urge to provoke. In the midst of all of his talk about togetherness, he puts out there his belief that the economic problems of America’s working class are largely its own fault, stemming from factors like the presence of a lot of lazy men and morally loose women who have kids out of wedlock. Moreover, he argues, because of Americans’ growing tendency to pair up with the similarly educated, working-class children are increasingly genetically predisposed to be on the dim side.

(This is the point where heads turn, fists clench, and a hush is broken by the sound of liberal commenters muttering, “Oh no he didn’t.”)

Speaking here last week at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, a free-market-oriented think tank where he is a resident scholar, Mr. Murray, 69, argued that the nation’s greatness arose from its founders’ belief in industriousness, honesty, marriage, and religiosity. In today’s working-class communities, however, religious people are seen as “oddballs,” he said, and men deride each other for getting off the couch and taking perfectly adequate jobs commensurate with their training. Divorce and crime rates are exceptionally high, and the “collapse of social trust” has left people unable to count on others to be fair, trustworthy, or helpful.

Assuring the crowd that his book is not politically partisan, Mr. Murray took shots at the wealthy as well. He waved his arms toward the neighborhoods of northwest Washington and its Virginia and Maryland suburbs that he calls “SuperZips” because of their residents’ exceptionally high incomes and education levels, and he argued that people clustered in such communities are losing touch with mainstream America and much of what it has to offer. He protested that the upper class “has lost self-confidence in the rightness” of the value system that brought it wealth, and, rather than proclaiming the importance of hard work, religious faith, and family commitment, instead abides by “a set of mushy injunctions to be nice.”

A lot more at the link… I haven’t read the book yet (it is on my short list), but his thesis is basically a cultural divide threatens our little project here in the U.S. of A. It seems to fit in the zeitgeist of A Nation of Moochers and Mark Steyn’s work as well.

UPDATE: Virginia Postrel (always a great read) has a contra-Murray argument here at Bloomberg. LIke her I’m usually skeptical of “it was better back then than it is now” arguments. Anyway.. I have yet to fully look at both sides so

3 comments to Discuss!

  • David Marcoe

    Could I just post a picture of manboobs as a rebuttal?

  • Daniel Crandall

    I’ll also note that I’ve not read the book. That being said, this is the second review I’ve seen that points out the part of Murray’s book that seems to be steadfastly avoided when he’s interviewed by conservative radio (radio-cons?):

    “… that the economic problems of America’s working class are largely its own fault, stemming from factors like the presence of a lot of lazy men and morally loose women who have kids out of wedlock. Moreover, he argues, because of Americans’ growing tendency to pair up with the similarly educated, working-class children are increasingly genetically predisposed to be on the dim side.”

    I wonder if “Idiocracy” is one of Murray’s favorite movies.

    • Rufus

      As the child of “working-class” parents who married the daughter of “working-class” parents I’ll stack our educations up against any married children of blue-bloods. The problem isn’t being raised by parents who get out of bed every morning and report to work on time, even if they do manual labor on the job.

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